Dec 01, 2020  
2019-2020 Academic Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Academic Catalog Archived Catalog

Courses in The Arts: Music, Literature, Painting, Drawing, Poetry, Ceramics,Theatre, Film, Photography and more


Humanities

Courses

Art: Art History (ARTH)

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    ARTH 200FGH - Art of World Civilization I


    Credit(s): 3

    This class is a survey of the history of painting, architecture, sculpture, and other arts of Western Civilization - Ancient to Middle Ages. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTH 201FGH - Art of World Civilization II


    Credit(s): 3

    This class is a survey of the history of painting, architecture, sculpture, and other arts of Western Civilization - Renaissance to Modern. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTH 225FG - Art and Architecture of Venice


    Credit(s): 3

    Corequisite(s): ARTH 226 , ARTH 227 .
    This course examines the art and architecture of Italy. Students will explore the works of the artists and architects of Italy with specific attention given to Venice from the 4th century onward. The class will consist of a series of excursions to historic sites, important architectural structures, and museums. Emphasis will be on the recognition of the unique character that is found in the Italian style. (Intermittently)
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    ARTH 226 - History and Culture of Venice


    Credit(s): 2

    Corequisite(s): ARTH 225 , ARTH 227 .
    This course examines the evolution of both the physical and cultural aspects of Venice, Italy. This course begins with an exploration of the geography of the islands that comprise the city and the lagoon that surrounds it. Visiting historic sites will allow students first-hand insights into the story of Venice. Most of the lectures will be conducted outside of the classroom. Students will study the history of Venice from 400 BCE to the present with an emphasis on the evolution of cultural and technological elements of modern Venetian life. (Intermittently)
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    ARTH 227FG - History of Theatre in Venice


    Credit(s): 3

    Corequisite(s): ARTH 225 , ARTH 226 .
    This course is a study of Italian theatrical history as it relates to Venice and the surrounding area. It will trace drama from its origins in Greek Dionysian religious festivals and consequent usurpation by the Romans through the development of the very specifically Italian forms, commedia del arte and grand opera. The location and timing of this course will provide students with a unique, first-hand experience in Italian theatrical culture. Ruins of the ancient Roman amphitheatre at Concordia Sagittaria and the exquisitely preserved Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza, designed by Andrea Palladio, the oldest extant indoor theatre in the world, with its lovingly maintained original scenery in forced perspective from its initial performance of Oedipus Rex in 1584, will give students physical contact with historical theatrical practices. And access to La Fenice, the recently renovated Venetian opera house originally completed in 1792, as well as performances there, offers the opportunity to expose students to an art form that has uniquely Italian origins. Also, the dates of the course encompass the traditional Italian pre-Lenten celebration of carnevale when visitors and residents alike don elaborate and historically authentic costumes and masks, when squares and alleys are filled with street performers of all stripes, including commedia del arte troupes performing works by the masters of 16th century comedy on rude stages with no amplification and historically accurate costumes and props, culminating in an elaborately staged pageant, all of which will immerse the students in a three-dimensional world of theatre that no solely academic curriculum could hope to provide. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTH 228FGH - History of Early Italian Renaissance


    Credit(s): 3

    This course aims to introduce students to the development of style and meaning in Italian 14th century art. Painting, sculpture and architecture will be the main disciplines explored. (Spring Semester)

Art: Jewelry (ARTJ)

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    ARTJ 210F - Jewelry and Metalsmithing I


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is an introduction to the tools, techniques, and materials of the professional jeweler/metalsmith with emphasis on the design and production of jewelry objects. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTJ 211F - Jewelry and Metalsmithing II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 210 .
    A continuation of ARTJ 210 , this course provides further introduction of the tools, techniques, and materials of the professional jeweler/metalsmith. Emphasizes working more 3-dimensionally with greater complexity. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTJ 212 - Jewelry and Metalsmithing III


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 211 .
    This course is an in-depth investigation into the tools, techniques, and materials of the professional jeweler.  Emphasis will be on the mechanics, ergonomics, and engineering of complex jewelry projects. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTJ 213 - Jewelry and Metalsmithing IV


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 212 .
    A continuation of ARTJ 212, this course provides a further in-depth investigation into the tools, techniques, and materials of the professional jeweler/metalsmith.  Emphasis will be on business and production methods of the independent studio artist.  (Spring Semester)
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    ARTJ 220 - Forging and Smithing I


    Credit(s): 3

    Corequisite(s): ARTJ 210 .
    Forging and smithing are ancient hammer and anvil based techniques that take advantage of the plastic qualities of metal. This course concentrates on hammer formed jewelry items utilizing non-ferrous metals such as copper, brass, silver, and gold. The course will introduce the student to the following topics: forging and raising techniques, hammers, anvils, forming stakes, tool maintenance. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTJ 221 - Forging and Smithing II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 220 .
    This course is designed to explore the use of the hydraulic press in jewelry and vessel construction. Emphasis will be in die making involved in the processes. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTJ 231 - 3D Jewelry Design and Modeling I


    Credit(s): 4

    This is a jewelry foundational course designed to teach the student how to design in a 3D CAD/CAM software environment and to further take those designs and create finished wax models on prototyping CNC mills. Manufacturing issues and techniques that will be found in a production setting will be explored. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTJ 232 - 3D Jewelry Design and Modeling II


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 231 .
    This is an advanced jewelry course designed to continue teaching the student how to design in a 3D CAD/CAM software environment and to further take those designs and create finished wax models on prototyping CNC mills. Manufacturing issues and techniques that will be found in a production setting will be explored. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTJ 233 - 3D Jewelry Design and Modeling III


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 232 .
    This upper level jewelry course is designed to further the education of students who have completed the first and second semester of the CAD/CAM programs. The class will focus on more complex design and milling projects including making galleries, sculpting tools, two and three sided projects, two-color metal projects, and design and milling of metal molds. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTJ 234 - 3D Jewelry Design and Modeling IV


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 233 .
    This advanced CAD/CAM jewelry course is designed to expand skills acquired in the first three semesters of the jewelry CAD/CAM programs. The class will focus on the completion of complex custom designs from inception to ready-for-market pieces. Additionally, students will integrate the preparation of portfolio, marketing, and human relations skills in a simulated jewelry business environment. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTJ 250 - Wax Modeling and Casting I


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is an introduction to casting tools, techniques, and materials of the professional jeweler/metalsmith. Emphasis will be on the design and production of custom pieces. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTJ 251 - Wax Modeling and Casting II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 250 .
    A continuation of ARTJ 250, this course provides an in-depth investigation into casting tools, techniques and materials of the professional jeweler/metalsmith. Emphasis will be on design and production of multiples. (Intermittently)
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    ARTJ 260 - Stone Setting I


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): instructor’s consent.
    In this course, students build basic stone setting skills by learning tool assembly and shaping, and how to set stones in a round, oval and pear-marquis head setting. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTJ 261 - Stone Setting II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): instructor’s consent.
    Students build stone setting skills by completing head settings and assembling tools for channel, flush, pave’ and gypsy settings. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTJ 270 - Surface Embellishments I


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 210 .
    This course concentrates on textural and chromatic surface treatments for all non-ferrous metals including silver and gold. Included among the topics covered will be reticulation, acidetching, enameling, fusing, hammer and punch treatments, patination, roller printing, and media blasting among others. These are all vital techniques which are, due to their proliferation and technical nature, beyond the scope of basic jewelry classes. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTJ 280 - Jewelry Repair I


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTJ 210 , ARTJ 211 .
    This comprehensive course teaches students the skills necessary for basic jewelry repair. Students are expected to identify various precious metals as well as cleaning, refurbishing and polishing jewelry. In addition, students learn to size rings, repair broken jewelry and replace stones in damaged pieces. Specifics include: precious metal terminology, cleaning and polishing for repair, soldering techniques for heads and shanks, ring sizing and reshanks, hinge and catch repair, broken chains, diamond removal and tightening, prong work and re-tipping, estimating price quotes. (Intermittently)

Art: Visual Arts (ARTZ)

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    ARTZ 101 - Art Fundamentals


    Credit(s): 3

    This course focuses on the introduction to the craft, materials and conceptual concerns of two- and three-dimensional visual arts. No prior art experience is expected.  (All Semesters)
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    ARTZ 105F - Visual Language-Drawing


    Credit(s): 3

    This course, a presentation to art students with varying degrees of talent and exposures to instruction, is designed to help each student develop his or her own unique style. Considerable emphasis is placed upon the perception of the draftsperson and problems arising from the representation of three-dimensional objects on two-dimensional planes. Exercises using a variety of media and papers will occupy a great portion of this course. Class problems and assignments are planned to meet the individual needs of all students. Uniformity is not the aim. The major aim is the exposure to, and subsequent assimilation of, basic drawing “tools.” (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    ARTZ 106F - Visual Language-2-D Foundations


    Credit(s): 3

    A foundational course designed to present basic concepts, this course focuses on organization, structure, and composition of form through the use of basic design elements, such as line, shape, and value, and emphasizes design development, which is related to two-dimensional art. (Fall Semester)
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    ARTZ 108F - Visual Language-3-D Foundations


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is a continuation of ARTZ 106 , a foundational course designed to present basic concepts, studying organization, structure and composition of forms through the use of basic design elements. Emphasis is on three-dimensionality. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTZ 130 - Introduction to Ceramics


    Credit(s): 1

    This introductory short course is designed for students interested in learning the fundamentals of wheel throwing and trimming clay, as well as glazing pottery. The course is designed for students who are not sure they can commit to a full semester course. This course may be repeated for a total of two credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    ARTZ 210 - Professional Practices


    Credit(s): 3

    This course covers the initial development of visual portfolio, photographing and exhibiting artwork, artist statement, and other preparation for transfer to a BFA program in visual arts.  Students will also be prepared for graduate exhibition opportunities as well as for entry into the professional business of art. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTZ 211 - Drawing I: Life Drawing


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTZ 105 .
    This is a course designed for the more advanced student. It is expected that prospective students will understand and be capable of demonstrating basic techniques and applications of media. The course is committed to the drawing of the human figure. The first sessions are dedicated to the physiology of the body, the skeletal structure first and then the muscular organization. It is a course aimed at encouraging the student to develop his or her own way of assimilating previous drafting knowledge with the intricacies of the human form. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    ARTZ 212 - Drawing Studio: Personal Style


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTZ 105 .
    This course is aimed at students with varying degrees of ability who have successfully completed a beginning drawing program and wish to pursue drawing beyond the basic level. Exercises involving a broader variety of media, their application, and effects will be given emphasis. A portraiture component is included. Class problems and assignments will have enough flexibility to meet the individual needs of all students. The major aim of this course is to encourage the development of each student’s unique approach to drawing - a personal style. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTZ 221F - Painting I


    Credit(s): 3

    This elementary painting course seeks to acquaint students with the basic tools of the painter, focusing on technique and materials. Each assignment is tailored to both satisfy the need for individual expression and to present a vehicle for the practice of new techniques. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    ARTZ 222u - Painting Studio: Oil


    Credit(s): 3

    A continuation of study for the aspiring painter, this course allows time for practical experience with brush at the easel, combined with periods of open discussion, lecture sharing and critique. The focus of this class is help and direction for the individual student in developing a unique and personal expression. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    ARTZ 222v - Painting Studio: Portrait


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed for both beginning and more advanced students to develop the skills necessary to complete an oil portrait of a live model. Progressing from the large and less complicated structures of the human head, neck, and torso to the finer and more complex structures, the student will learn the significant topographical anatomy and employ the concepts of composition, design, perspective, color, light and shadow, character and narrative to establish a “likeness.” Each student will be encouraged to develop his or her own style. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (All Semesters)
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    ARTZ 222y - Painting Studio: Composition


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTZ 221 .
    This course is a continuation of ARTZ 221  where the basic tools of the painter are now focused more on composition and color experimentation. It is expected that the student will exercise more personal preference and choice in both subject matter and expression. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTZ 222z - Painting Studio: Oil Painting Human Figure


    Credit(s): 3

    Inspired by figure painting masters of the past and present, this course is designed for the student or professional who is ready to take their drawing and painting skills to a new level. The student will be exposed to a wide variety of Alla Prima painting techniques while they accumulate a basic understanding of artistic anatomy. Each session of this class will be a direct painting experience from the live model. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits.  Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTZ 224F - Watercolor I


    Credit(s): 3

    A study of the history, materials, techniques and presentation of transparent watercolor, this course considers a variety of subject matter. Summer classes will be conducted “en plein air” (outdoors) weather permitting. (All Semesters)
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    ARTZ 225 - Watercolor Studio: Transparent


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTZ 224  or instructor’s consent.
    An in-depth continuation of ARTZ 224 , this course is a study of the history, materials, techniques, and presentation of transparent watercolor with a variety of subject matter considered. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (All Semesters)
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    ARTZ 231F - Ceramics I


    Credit(s): 3

    This is an introductory ceramics course which will include the history, development, and aesthetics of ceramic vessels and sculpture. Students will learn basic technical aspects of building clay, working with glazes, and the firing of ceramic objects. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving and the development of ideas. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    ARTZ 232s - Ceramics Studio: Personal Techniques


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTZ 231  or instructor’s consent.
    This course encourages students to develop personal techniques in clay and develop a portfolio of work. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (All Semesters)
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    ARTZ 232u - Ceramics Studio: Tools and Techniques


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is a comprehensive introduction to sculptural ceramic processes and equipment. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    ARTZ 232v - Ceramics Studio: Wheel Throwing


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed for all levels of students interested in developing pottery throwing skills including wheel throwing, trimming clay and glazing techniques. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring)
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    ARTZ 232y - Ceramics Studio: Tile Making


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is a tile making class with emphasis on the various techniques used to produce and install tile murals, as well as an exploration of a variety of historical and contemporary techniques used to create tile. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTZ 252 - Sculpture Studio: 3D Computer Modeling and Printing


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is a lecture/lab that focuses on the use of 3D printing systems and their potential in producing elements of sculptural works. Students will learn how to design, lay out and produce three dimensional works and explore the possibilities of using CAD software as viable terrain for creative thought.  Students will be encouraged to incorporate mixed media into their projects and resolve their pieces as finished works of art. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits.  Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Spring Semester)
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    ARTZ 271 - Printmaking I


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARTZ 105 .
    This is an introductory course in the art and technique of Intaglio and collagraph. Basic plate preparation, experimentation with a variety of grounds and tones, and the use of the press will be covered. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Communication (COMX)

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    COMX 111C - Introduction to Public Speaking


    Credit(s): 3

    This course focuses on preparation, presentation, and criticism of speeches. Emphasis is on the development of public speaking techniques through constructive criticism. (All Semesters)
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    COMX 115C - Introduction to Interpersonal Communication


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is a study of and practice in communication skills in professional life and in daily relationships. (All Semesters)
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    COMX 215 - Negotiations/Conflict Resolution


    Credit(s): 3

    This introductory course will focus on concepts, skills, and strategies for effective resolution of conflicts through negotiation. Emphasis will be placed on the application of concepts learned through the use of simulated exercises and case studies which allow students to apply, practice, and evaluate negotiation skills. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    COMX 217CF - Oral Interpretation of Literature


    Credit(s): 3

    The techniques, practice, and performance of effective oral reading will be the subject of this course. Poetry, drama, children’s literature, stories, speeches, and articles will be analyzed, practiced, and performed before the class. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    COMX 220 - Introduction to Organizational Communication


    Credit(s): 3

    This course introduces theory and research on communication in organizations. Focus is on topics such as productivity, power, culture, socialization, technology and globalization covering a wide range of organizations including corporations, government, educational institutions, non-profit agencies and media organizations. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Creative Writing (CRWR)

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    CRWR 110F - Beginning Fiction


    Credit(s): 3

    This introductory writers’ workshop focuses on the critique and revision of students’ short fiction. Contemporary literary short stories, short shorts and parables will be emphasized. Students will study fiction elements and techniques, including character sketches, beginnings, dialogue, point of view, plot, authorial distance, significant detail, scene, characterization, and endings. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    CRWR 111F - Beginning Poetry


    Credit(s): 3

    This course focuses on the reading and writing of poetry with emphasis on the techniques of imaginative writing and critical appraisal. (All Semesters)
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    CRWR 210 - Introduction Fiction Workshop


    Credit(s): 3

    This intermediate course focuses on critique and revision of students’ short fiction or on chapters of students’ novels. Students will be expected to finish three stories of literary quality. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    CRWR 211 - Introduction Poetry Workshop


    Credit(s): 3

    An advanced course in the writing of poetry, this course considers special problems in this area as well as refinement of the student’s skill. (All Semesters)
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    CRWR 212F - Introduction Nonfiction Workshop


    Credit(s): 3

    Study the art of nonfiction through reading and responding to contemporary nonfiction and the writing of original nonfiction works. Focus is on creative expression, writing technique and nonfiction forms.  Students begin with writing exercises and brief essays, advancing to longer forms as the semester progresses. (Spring Semester)

Graphic Design (GDSN)

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    GDSN 130 - Typography


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): GDSN 148  or GDSN 200 .
    Corequisite(s): GDSN 148  or GDSN 200 .
    Because the eye is trained to appreciate the sensibilities and subtleties of typographic conventions such as kerning, leading, style, and practice, in this course students will gain an understanding of the vocabulary surrounding letter forms and the design of text.  Symbolic communication inherent in different typefaces will also be explored.  Typographic relationships with other graphic elements will be investigated through brochures, posters and other two-dimensional projects. (Fall Semester)
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    GDSN 148 - Digital Illustration I


    Credit(s): 3

    This is a beginning course in the use of Adobe Illustrator where students will develop vector-drawing abilities through a variety of skill-based assignments, with an emphasis on concept, creativity, technical achievement and presentation. In addition, students learn file preparation standards for production, including file formats, color palettes and image resolution. The most recent version of Illustrator is highly recommended. (Fall Semester)
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    GDSN 149 - Digital Imaging I


    Credit(s): 3

    This is a beginning course in the use of Adobe Photoshop. This class will introduce the concepts of basic digital image manipulation techniques. This includes cropping images, selecting details, creating new layers, adjusting color balance/contrast, adding type, web optimization, resampling/resizing of images, and using alpha channels. More intermediate topics such as layer mask selection, clipping masks, layer adjustments, filters, and image slicing will be introduced. The most recent version of Photoshop is highly recommended. (Fall Semester)
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    GDSN 200 - Introduction to Desktop Publishing


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): GDSN 148  and GDSN 149 .
    This is a fast-paced course in the use of Adobe InDesign. The concepts of integrating imagery and type as art, identity branding, and multi-page layouts will be covered extensively. Students must be proficient with Illustrator and Photoshop because this course combines photo, illustration, and typography to create cohesive layouts. Students will finish this class with the ability to create a small magazine from concept to creation to production. The most recent version of InDesign is highly recommended. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    GDSN 230 - Video Editing


    Credit(s): 4

    This course integrates graphic design skills with video editing to create short promotional videos.  Students explore basic working concepts of the art of video editing through the use of linear and non-linear video editing to tell a story from start to finish with a detailed plot arc.  Topics include capturing digital video, organizing projects, storing video clips, explaining the browser, viewer, canvas, and timeline.  Students learn advanced features such as special effects, camera angles, techniques for connecting shots, overlapping sound sequences, and text effects. (Spring Semester)
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    GDSN 247 - Digital Portfolio Preparation


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): GDSN 250 .
    In this course, students develop a unique identity and branding to showcase examples of both graphic design and web technology pieces in preparation for the job market. A cohesive design will be displayed through a resume, business card, leave behind, print portfolio, and digital portfolio. This capstone course prepares Graphic Design and Web Technology students for the job market by teaching interviewing skills and independent contract techniques. (Spring Semester)
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    GDSN 248 - Digital Illustration II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): GDSN 148 .
    This is an advanced course in the use of Adobe Illustrator. The concepts of advanced digital illustration will be introduced and explored. This includes drawing in 3D, using perspective, streamlining color management, creating customized brushes, and using special effects. Also, a strong emphasis on typography as a design element will be applied. The most recent version of Illustrator is highly recommended. (Spring Semester)
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    GDSN 249 - Digital Imaging II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): GDSN 149 .
    This is an advanced course in the use of Adobe Photoshop. The concepts of advanced digital image manipulation techniques will be introduced and explored through Photoshop. This includes advanced techniques in retouching and enhancing techniques, creating special effects, and applying artistic type, textures and filters. The use of multiple layers with adjustments, blending modes, clipping masks, alpha channels, puppet warp, liquefy and other filters, will be thoroughly explored. The most recent version of Photoshop is highly recommended. (Spring Semester)
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    GDSN 250 - Graphic Design I


    Credit(s): 3

    This course provides an introduction to the principles of Graphic Design that can be applied in photography, painting, and fine arts. The course covers the fundamentals of graphic design with an emphasis on creative problem solving. Students will learn composition, color theory, models and schemes, design components, typography and terminology, resolution, design basics to prepare for web, the marketing process including branding, standard business practices, contracts and ethical guidelines for the graphic arts industry. Students work on critical thinking skills by completing visual problem-solving exercises. This is an introductory course so assignments done on a computer will not be required. (Fall Semester)
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    GDSN 274 - Portfolio Presentation


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): instructor’s consent.
    Exploration of techniques and formats used for the documentation and presentation of 2D and 3D artworks. Film, digital and web-based technologies will be used. Students will learn how to create and present portfolios of artwork. (Spring Semester)
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    GDSN 298 - Internship: Graphic Design


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): completion of 30 credits with a GPA of 2.0 or better, and submission of an internship application.
    This course offers a supervised, structured learning experience at an approved business/organization. Students experience the selection process, receive training related to their field of study, enhance their academic learning, and gain exposure to the workplace.  Students apply theoretical classroom concepts to real world workplace issues.  Typically, a student completes 45 site hours per one credit of lecture.  Additionally, students participate in activities and class time beyond the hours spent at the job site. (All Semesters)

Global Humanities (GH)

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    GH 151H - Introduction to Western Humanities (Antiquity)


    Formerly LSH 261H Introduction to the Humanities Origins and Influences I

    Credit(s): 4

    This course offers an interdisciplinary survey of human creative achievements from Prehistory through the Late Middle Ages. By examining major works of art, architecture, music, literature and philosophy, students will gain an awareness of human productivity and the historical contexts that provided its inspiration, as well as an enhanced appreciation of the rich cultural heritage that informs our own contemporary identity. (Fall Semester)
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    GH 152H - Introduction to Western Humanities (Modernity)


    Formerly LSH 262H Introduction to the Humanities Origins and Influences II

    Credit(s): 4

    This course offers an interdisciplinary survey of human creative achievements from Early Renaissance to Postmodernism. By examining major works of art, architecture, music, literature and philosophy, students will gain an awareness of human productivity and the historical contexts that provided its inspiration, as well as an enhanced appreciation of the rich cultural heritage that informs our own contemporary identity. (Spring Semester)

Languages: Italian (ITLN)

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    ITLN 101GH - Elementary Italian I


    Credit(s): 4

    This course will bring students directly in touch with the language and culture of contemporary Italy. The format and structure will enable students to acquire solid grammar and conversational skills and become acquainted with the Italian culture. (Intermittently)
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    ITLN 102GH - Elementary Italian II


    Credit(s): 4

    This course will broaden students’ Italian language skills and deal more in-depth with Italian culture and history. (Intermittently)

Literature (LIT)

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    LIT 110H - Introduction to Literature


    Credit(s): 3

    This introductory course focuses on the reading, enjoyment, and critical analysis of fiction, poetry and drama. Students will read world literature, as well as works of the American West, contemporary dramatists, minority writers, and works focusing on the lives of immigrants, expatriates, and first-generation Americans. (Fall Semester)
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    LIT 112H - Introduction to Fiction


    Credit(s): 3

    This introductory course focuses on the reading, enjoyment, and critical analysis of the short story and the novel. Students will read world literature, as well as contemporary writers of the American West; minority writers; and writers focusing on the lives of immigrants, expatriates and first-generation Americans. (Spring Semester)
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    LIT 120H - Poetry


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is an introduction to the reading, enjoyment, interpretation, critical analysis, and appreciation of selected poetry. (Fall Semester)
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    LIT 201 - Introduction to Literary Studies


    Credit(s): 3

    This writing-intensive introduction to the English major will prepare students for advanced study in literature by providing them with the foundational skills of literary analysis, literary theory, disciplinary methodologies, and close readings of literary texts. (Spring Semester)
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    LIT 210H - American Literature I


    Credit(s): 3

    This survey course is designed to give students a broad overview of the evolving canon of influential literary works produced in America from approximately 1600 through 1865. Students will read a variety of exemplary texts from a historical perspective in order to critically analyze the formation of our American identity. (Fall Semester)
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    LIT 211H - American Literature II


    Credit(s): 3

    This survey course is designed to give students a broad overview of the evolving canon of influential works produced in American Literature from 1865 to the present. Students will examine a variety of authors including African American, Native American, Asian, and Hispanic writers, and will focus on increasing awareness of how historical, economic, social, and geographical concerns help to mold our unique American identity. (Spring Semester)
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    LIT 214GH - Regional Literature


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is an examination of regional literature in the context of critical multiculturalism. It analyzes topics through historical and cultural lenses and may focus on a specific regional literature or adopt a comparative approach. (Fall Semester)
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    LIT 216H - American Short Story


    Credit(s): 3

    This course will trace the popular literary genre known as the short story from its inception in the early 19th century through the present. The course will examine the role of the short story in American history, and will focus on stories that reflect the various social, economic, and gender concerns of male and female authors from diverse ethnic backgrounds. (Spring Semester)
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    LIT 223H - British Literature I


    Credit(s): 3

    This introduction to British writers and works begins with the ancient heroes and monsters in Beowulf and continues through the Middle Ages with readings from “The Canterbury Tales,” as well as King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. The adventure continues during the Renaissance with “The Tragedy of Dr. Faustus,” then moves on to a variety of works during the Restoration and 18th century: from the stinging satire, “Gulliver’s Travels” to the hilarious comedy “She Stoops to Conquer.” Literature read throughout the course will include a number of poems, essays, plays and stories. (Fall Semester)
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    LIT 224H - British Literature II


    Credit(s): 3

    The course includes Romantic poets Wordsworth and Keats, Victorians Bronte, Tennyson, and Elizabeth Barret Browning as well as 20th century writers D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Tom Stoppard and Seamus Heaney. (Spring Semester)
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    LIT 225H - Shakespeare: Tragedy and Comedy


    Credit(s): 3

    In this course students will read, discuss and, if possible, see a presentation of selected tragedies and comedies: King Lear, Julius Caesar, The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and others. (Spring Semester)
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    LIT 226H - Shakespeare: History and Tragedy


    Credit(s): 3

    In this course students will read, discuss and, if possible, see a presentation of selected tragedies and history plays of Shakespeare: Hamlet, Othello, MacBeth, Henry IV, Part I, Richard II, and others. (Fall Semester)
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    LIT 271H - Introduction to Science Fiction Literature


    Credit(s): 4

    This course will study the development of science fiction as a literary genre that investigates the technological and social dilemmas encountered by humanity. The history of science fiction, the significant authors, and the genre’s moral questions will be covered through an examination of the texts and films that have framed science fiction. (Spring Semester)
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    LIT 285H - Mythologies


    Credit(s): 3

    The course examines the purpose and applications of mythology in both historical and contemporary culture and how myths can transform through different periods, across cultures.  Students will explore global mythologies including the ancient Greeks, Norse, Egyptians, Chinese, and indigenous Americans.  (Fall Semester)

Media Arts (MART)

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    MART 231 - Interactive Web I


    Credit(s): 4

    This course introduces web development tools to create websites using industry standard practices and techniques. Students use HTML5 and Cascading Style Sheets to plan, design, and develop responsive websites. Topics include web design best practices, website hosting, web graphics, design standards, and embedding media. (Fall Semester)
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    MART 232 - Interactive Web II


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): MART 231 .
    This course focuses on teaching students advanced web design concepts. Students will further their experience with web design, focusing on HTML5, CSS3, and a CMS to create responsive designs. (Spring Semester)
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    MART 234 - Emerging Web Technologies


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): MART 232 .
    An advanced web course where students will explore new and emerging web technologies. This project-based course will apply these new techniques and tools to website development. (Fall Semester)

Music (MUSI)

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    MUSI 101F - Enjoyment of Music


    Credit(s): 3

    This course traces the development of art music through the past 1000 years. Vocal and instrumental music and composers from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and 20th century will be examined through listening, reading, and writing. Students will be presented with the analytical and comparative tools to identify and understand the various historical musical eras. (Fall Semester)
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    MUSI 102 - Performance Study


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): instructor’s consent.
    Title will vary.  Private instruction for the non-music major or minor in voice, piano, string, wind and/or percussion instruments.  This course covers the study of performing techniques, music interpretation, expression and style at a beginner level.  Note: fees for tuition and lessons are separate payments.  Students may expect to pay an additional fee for lessons in addition to tuition. (Intermittently)
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    MUSI 104 - Music Fundamentals


    Credit(s): 1

    This course provides an introduction to the music fundamentals including the grand staff, note reading in bass and treble clef, note values, time signatures, dynamics and tempo markings, articulations, accidentals, and major scales. (All Semesters)
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    MUSI 105F - Music Theory I


    Credit(s): 3

    Corequisite(s): MUSI 140 .
    This is a course that teaches the fundamentals of music theory: meter, note values, rests, intervals, major scales, circle of fifths, chord construction, minor scales, basic harmonic progression, whole-tone scales and modes. (Fall Semester)
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    MUSI 106F - Music Theory II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): MUSI 105 .
    Corequisite(s): MUSI 141 .
    This course is a continuation of MUSI 105 , which teaches the fundamentals of music theory (meter, note values, rests, intervals, major scales, circle of fifths, chord construction, minor scales, basic harmonic progression, whole-tone scales and modes). (Spring Semester)
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    MUSI 108r - Orchestra: FVCC


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): audition.
    The FVCC Orchestra prepares and performs orchestral literature of the past and present and requires rehearsals and public performances. Students must supply their own musical instruments. A maximum of six credits in music ensemble may be applied towards graduation. Students receiving financial aid or veterans’ benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    MUSI 108u - Orchestra: Glacier Symphony


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): audition.
    An audition-only group, the symphony prepares and performs orchestral literature of the past and present and requires intensive rehearsals and public performances. Students must supply their own musical instruments. A maximum of six credits in music ensemble may be applied towards graduation. Students receiving financial aid or veterans’ benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    MUSI 111 - Group Voice Class


    Credit(s): 2

    This course provides an introduction to the skills which enable and enhance healthy singing, including: proper vocal technique, performance skills, and artistic presentation. Course is taught in a group setting. Appropriate to all levels, students do not have to read music in order to succeed in this course. (Spring Semester)
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    MUSI 112x - Choir: Glacier Chorale


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): audition.
    An audition-only group, the chorale prepares and performs orchestral literature of the past and present and requires intensive rehearsals and public performances. A maximum of six credits in music ensemble may be applied towards graduation. Students receiving financial aid or veterans’ benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    MUSI 114 - Band: Community Band


    Credit(s): 1

    This course introduces the inner workings of a band program with survey and basic training on a variety of instruments. A maximum of six credits in music ensemble may be applied towards graduation. Students receiving financial aid or veterans’ benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
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    MUSI 132F - History of Rock and Roll


    Credit(s): 3

    This course surveys the development of rock and roll music from its early blues roots to the present decade. The student will become familiar with the various stylistic music eras through lecture, listening, analysis, discussion and student projects. Students will learn varieties and lineage of an important popular musical art and acquire the tools to identify and compare various historical styles. (Spring Semester)
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    MUSI 135 - Keyboard Skills I


    Credit(s): 1

    This course focuses on functional keyboard skills such as scales, sight reading, harmonization, transposition, and literature. A working understanding of musical notation is needed in order to succeed in this course. Intended to be taken concurrently with Music Theory and Aural Perception, but open to interested non-majors with a musical background. (Fall Semester)
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    MUSI 136 - Keyboard Skills II


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): MUSI 135 .
    This course, a continuation of MUSI 135 , focuses on functional keyboard skills such as scales, sight reading, harmonization, transposition, and literature. Intended to be taken concurrently with Music Theory and Aural Perception, but open to interested non-majors with a musical background. (Spring Semester)
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    MUSI 140 - Aural Perception I


    Credit(s): 2

    Corequisite(s): MUSI 105 .
    This course builds aural skills through the use of singing and dictation to supplement MUSI 105. (Fall Semester)
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