Dec 01, 2020  
2017-2018 Academic Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Academic Catalog Archived Catalog

Course Descriptions


How to search this page:

  1. If you know the specific course you are looking for, choose the prefix from the pull down menu labeled “Prefix,” type in the course number, and click on “Filter.”

  2. If you know the prefix, but not the number, just choose the prefix and click on”Filter.”

  3. If you are looking for classes in a specific subject area, choose from the drop-down menu in the box underneath the word “Type” and click on “Filter.”

  4. If you know a word in the course title enter it into the “Keyword or Phrase” box and click on “Filter.” 

  

 

History: American (HSTA)

  
  •  

    HSTA 111B - American Civil Rights Movement


    Credit(s): 3

    This course examines the historic background of the civil rights movement in the United States and discusses the events at the core of the movement in the 1950s and 1960s, putting the civil rights movement in the context of US political, social, and economic history. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    HSTA 255B - Montana History


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is an examination and evaluation of the political, social, cultural, economic, and geographic heritage of Montana as a territory and a state. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

History: World (HSTR)

  
  •  

    HSTR 101B - Western Civilization I


    Credit(s): 4

    This course covers prehistoric days to the mid-17th century, with emphasis on the political, social, cultural, and economic aspects of the great civilizations of the earlier period, and the revolutions in politics, commerce, industry, and science which ushered in the modern era. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    HSTR 102B - Western Civilization II


    Credit(s): 4

    This course covers early 1500s to the present with emphasis on the rise of national systems, and the on-going revolutions in Western Civilization with attendant philosophic, economic, and political conflicts and influences. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    HSTR 284G - Environmental History


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is an introduction to the Western Civilization background, American development, and current global implications of environmental issues. (Fall Semester)

Health (HTH)

  
  •  

    HTH 101 - Opportunities in the Health Professions


    Credit(s): 2

    This course is intended to offer students an opportunity to explore the world of health care. Through research, discussion groups, and observations, students will explore various career paths in health care. Students will identify the educational requirements for various health care careers. Some of the topics to be discussed are characteristics of health care personnel, certifications and licensing, health care systems, health care philosophy, law and ethics pertaining to health care, client advocacy, current issues and trends in health care and economic issues in health care. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    HTH 110 - Personal Health and Wellness


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is the study of health principles enabling the student to make the essential choices for a more healthful lifestyle. (Fall Semester)

Heating, Ventilating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration Maintenance Technology (HVC)

  
  •  

    HVC 101 - HVAC Fundamentals


    Credit(s): 2

    This course is designed to explore the common aspects of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, (HVAC) technology. Discussion will focus on such topics as heat transfer methods, basic terminology and definitions, industry specific safety topics, and applied physics for HVAC systems. This is the required foundation course for students enrolled in the HVAC program. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    HVC 120 - Boiler Operator Certification


    Credit(s): 2

    This is an introductory course in heating and power low pressure boiler systems. It will introduce the concepts and terminology of commercial, industrial, and residential boiler systems and emphasize troubleshooting and maintenance procedures employed in maintaining hot water systems. Area of focus include boiler fundamentals, boiler types, steam and hydronic boilers, fuels and burner types, valve identification, safety and relief valves, water level controllers, and industry safety issues associated with boiler accidents. The course will prepare students to take the Boiler Operator license exam. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    HVC 130 - HVAC Electrical


    Credit(s): 3

    Basic electrical safety and electrical theory such as Ohms Law, circuit schematic symbols, and circuit characteristics, will be discussed as it specifically applies to DC and AC circuits in the HVAC industry. Additional theory will be presented regarding magnetism as it applies to AC power generation. The course will also include discussions and calculation of the effects of capacitive, induction, and resistive circuits. The course concludes with an overview of transformers. This course is a prerequisite to HVC 230 . Students enrolled in the HVAC program are required to take this course. (Internet course only.) (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    HVC 140 - HVAC Systems I


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): HVC 101 .
    This course is a logical continuation of HVC 101 . Topics covered will include human comfort, psychometrics, introduction to basic air distribution systems, air flow measurement calculations and balance considerations. The course will culminate with the student doing a basic heat load calculation for a residential structure and selecting heating equipment to be installed. Students enrolled in the HVAC program are required to take this class. (Internet course only.) (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    HVC 198 - Internship: Basic HVAC


    Credit(s): 1-3

    Prerequisite(s): advisor’s consent.
    This course offers a supervised, structured learning experience at an approved HVAC business facility. Students will receive an orientation to some basic duties and tasks performed by a technician, and will be assigned some very basic tasks expected of an entry-level employee. Completion of these tasks, under the supervision of an experienced technician, will enhance the student’s knowledge of the day-to-day work of a technician in this field. Prior to placement at an internship site, students will attend an internship orientation to learn the application and internship process.  This course may be repeated one time for a maximum of three credits. Students recieving financial aid or veterans’ benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    HVC 230 - HVAC Electrical II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): HVC 130 .
    Areas of study will include basic control circuits, sequency of operation of basic HVAC applications, electric motor theory and specific information on HVAC electrical component devices. The main focus of this course is the various types of AC electric motors and starting components used by single-phase and three-phase motors found in residential and light commercial applications. Students enrolled in the HVAC program are required to take this course. (Internet course only.) (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    HVC 240 - HVAC Systems II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): HVC 140 .
    This course is a continuation of HVC 140 . Topics covered include duct sizing with activities based on previous work in HVC 140 . Additional activities will include a residential cooling load calculation and selection of cooling equipment. The course will conclude with an overview of accessories utilized in a residential HVAC system. Students enrolled in the HVAC program are required to take this class. (Internet course only.) (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    HVC 250 - HVAC Refrigeration I


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): HVC 140 .
    This course provides an introduction to the mechanical compression refrigeration cycle and the necessary components. Students will be introduced to the common terms and definitions of the cycle as well as what, when, and where to measure temperatures and pressures for diagnostics. An in-depth discussion of the four major components (i.e.; Compressor, Condenser, Metering Device, and Evaporator) will conclude with all of them working together in a hypothetical system moving heat energy. (Internet course only.) (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    HVC 295 - HVAC Field Experience I


    Credit(s): 10

    Prerequisite(s): instructor’s consent.
    This course is designed to provide students with career-related experience and an opportunity to benefit from those experiences. The field experience (the job) gives the student the chance to apply the skills and knowledge gained in the actual workplace. (Intermittently)

Individual Development (ID)

  
  •  

    ID 101 - Transition to College


    Credit(s): 1

    In this seminar course, students will explore academic and career opportunities within the various programs of study at FVCC.  Students will reflect on their values, interests, strengths, and how these impact the formation of their goals: academic and professional. Students will also be introduced to academic success strategies and methods to ensure a more successful transition to FVCC academics. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    ID 105 - College 101: Summer Experience


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): enrollment in Running Start Summer Experience Program.
    College 101: Summer Experience provides pre-collegiate students with academic success strategies for college, and resources for exploring educational and career opportunities. Students will participate in service learning and experiential activities and reflect on their values, skills, and leadership-styles. Students will create an academic and career action plan preparing them to enter college full-time. (Summer Semester)
  
  •  

    ID 110 - Professionalism 101: From College to Career


    ID 110 Career Awareness

    Credit(s): 1

    This course will prepare TRIO students to reach their career goals. Students will learn valuable professional skills including job and internship research, creating professional profiles, resume development, cover letter formatting, interview skills, negotiating salary and understanding benefits. Student will also reflect on their strengths and developing their skills and abilities for professional careers. The course prepares students entering the workforce directly after FVCC, as well as connects transfer students to career resources at four-year colleges and universities. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    ID 115 - Workforce Preparation for Occupational Trades


    Credit(s): 1

    This course prepares Occupational Trades students to enter the workforce by teaching professionalism necessary for success in their chosen industries. In the course, students create a working resume and cover letter, as well as learn interviewing and salary negotiations techniques. Topics covered include networking and communication, time management, and professional appearance. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    ID 120 - Employment Strategies


    Credit(s): 1

    This course introduces students to up-to-date, effective job search methods. Students will learn how to research employers, find job leads, develop job search tools and interview successfully, using both written and electronic techniques. (Fall Semester)

Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS)

  
  •  

    IDS 120 - Academic Communication Skills


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed to develop critical speaking, reading, and writing strategies. It focuses on increasing reading comprehension, rhetorical knowledge, conventions, critical thinking, and study skills. Students will engage in diverse applied writing, speaking, and listening opportunities. Students will be able to monitor positive and negative comprehension signals and apply appropriate strategies to correct incomplete comprehension. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Languages: Italian (ITLN)

  
  •  

    ITLN 101GH - Elementary Italian I


    Credit(s): 5

    This course’s primary goal is to bring students directly in touch with the language and culture of contemporary Italy. The course format and structure will enable students to acquire solid grammar and conversational skills but also get acquainted with the Italian culture. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITLN 102GH - Elementary Italian II


    Credit(s): 5

    Prerequisite(s): ITLN 101  or equivalent.
    This course will broaden students’ Italian language skills and deal more in-depth with Italian culture and history. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITLN 201 - Intermediate Italian I


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): ITLN 101  and ITLN 102  or instructor’s consent.
    This course will broaden students’ Italian language skills acquired in first-year Italian by offering a thorough review of grammar supplemented by a number of readings and communicative activities.  Students will deepen their knowledge of Italian language and culture as well as greatly increase their language proficiency. (Intermittently)

Information Technology Systems (ITS)

  
  •  

    ITS 164 - Networking Fundamentals


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is an introduction to networking fundamentals with both lecture and hands-on activities. Topics include the OSI model and industry standards, network topologies, IP addressing (including subnet masks), and basic network design. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITS 210 - Network Operating System-Desktop


    Credit(s): 3

    This course examines the role of operating system software and other user interfaces. The primary focus will be on the installation, operation, maintenance, and system/diagnostic utilities of microcomputer operating systems in a multi-tasking operating systems environment. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITS 212 - Network Operating System-Server Admin


    Credit(s): 3

    Emphasis is on management and use of common network operating systems. Topics and activities include product overview, installation, administration, problem resolution, configuration of security parameters and user accounts, console operations, and use of the network. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITS 216 - Network Operating System-Directory Services


    Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): ITS 212 .
    This course looks at the planning and implementation processes, installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting Active Directory found within MS Windows Server 2003. Group and security policy creation and implementation will also be developed. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITS 218 - Network Security


    Credit(s): 3

    This hands-on and theory-based course will study computer and network security. Topics will include threats; policy creation; implementing controls; securing hardware, networks, and operating systems; defending against attacks; and intrusion detection systems and practices. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITS 221 - Project Management


    Credit(s): 3

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with the tools to successfully manage a web site project. Topics covered include managing a project’s scope, cost, quality, and risk. Focus is on initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing projects. Software tools available to help manage and report on the project’s progress will also be explored. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    ITS 224 - Introduction to Linux


    Credit(s): 3

    Emphasis is on management and use of common open source network operating systems. Topics and activities include product overview, installation, administration, problem resolution, configuration of security parameters and user accounts, console operations and use of the network. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITS 235 - IT Design Lab


    Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): ITS 212 , ITS 258 .
    Corequisite(s): ITS 212 , ITS 258 .
    This is a capstone, controlled environment course allowing the students to plan a network, install software on clients and servers, attach to peripherals, apply security principles, and troubleshoot. Planning and documentation as a necessary component of information technology management will be included. (Intermitttently)
  
  •  

    ITS 258 - Routing and Switching


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): ITS 164 .
    This lab-based course will focus on network protocols, VLSM, router configuration, router IOS software management, routing protocols, access control lists, network address translation, LAN switching, and network design components. Troubleshooting in a network environment will be required. Objectives of the CCNA exam will be covered. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITS 280 - Computer Repair and Maintenance


    Credit(s): 3

    This course covers the basic to more advanced features of maintaining, troubleshooting, and repairing the PC as required for completion of the A+ Certification Exam. Topics include safety, memory management, operating systems, managing files, software and hardware replacement, upgrades, and installations. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    ITS 298 - Internship/Cooperative Education


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): completion of 30 semester credits with a grade point average of 2.0 or better and submission of an internship application.
    This course offers a supervised, structured learning experience at an approved business/organization. Students experience the selection process, receive training related to their field of study, enhance their academic learning, and gain exposure to the workplace.  Students apply theoretical classroom concepts to real-world workplace issues.  Typically, a student completes 45 hours on-site per one lecture credit.  Additionally, students participate in activities and class time beyond the hours spent at the job site. (All Semesters)

Kinesiology (KIN)

  
  •  

    KIN 201 - Basic Exercise Prescription


    Credit(s): 3

    A dynamic course designed to familiarize students with the concepts of aerobic exercise and resistance training related to the areas of health, fitness, and performance. This course involves a combination of learning techniques, including lecture and hands-on activities. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    KIN 203 - Functional Training


    Credit(s): 2

    In this course, students will develop a knowledge base of the variety of real world movements that the human body can generate, as well as exercises that can be utilized to improve the functionality of the human machine executing these movements. This course involves a combination of learning techniques including lecture and hands-on activities. This course may be repeated for a total of four credits. Students receiving financial aid or veterans’ benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    KIN 215 - Fitness Assessment Techniques


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic fitness assessment techniques and to provide an opportunity to develop assessment skills through hands-on laboratory experience. Discussions focus on background theory and rationale for each technique, assessment methodology and appropriate utilization of the generated information. (Spring Semester)

Linguistics (LING)

  
  •  

    LING 270 - Introduction to Linguistics


    Credit(s): 3

    This course will introduce students to the field of modern linguistics and to the nature of language. Students will gain an understanding of the fundamentals of linguistics, including syntax, semantics, phonology, pragmatics, language change, and language acquisition. (Intermittently)

Literature (LIT)

  
  •  

    LIT 110H - Introduction to Literature


    Credit(s): 3

    This introductory course focuses on the reading, enjoyment, and critical analysis of fiction, poetry and drama. Students will read world literature, as well as works of the American West, contemporary dramatists, minority writers, and works focusing on the lives of immigrants, expatriates, and first-generation Americans. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 112H - Introduction to Fiction


    Credit(s): 3

    This introductory course focuses on the reading, enjoyment, and critical analysis of the short story and the novel. Students will read world literature, as well as contemporary writers of the American West; minority writers; and writers focusing on the lives of immigrants, expatriates and first-generation Americans. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 120H - Poetry


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is an introduction to the reading, enjoyment, interpretation, critical analysis, and appreciation of selected poetry. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 201 - Introduction to Literary Studies


    Credit(s): 3

    This writing-intensive introduction to the English major will prepare students for advanced study in literature by providing them with the foundational skills of literary analysis, literary theory, disciplinary methodologies, and close readings of literary texts. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 206GH - European Literature of the 20th Century


    Credit(s): 3

    “The old country… ” mysterious, exotic, sophisticated, and full of contradictions: yet a much romanticized and nostalgically remembered “home” for so many Americans. This lecture and discussion course will focus on great writings and films of 20th century Europe, and familiarize students with crucial events of European art and history. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    LIT 210H - American Literature I


    Credit(s): 3

    This survey course is designed to give students a broad overview of the evolving canon of influential literary works produced in America from approximately 1600 through 1865. Students will read a variety of exemplary texts from a historical perspective in order to critically analyze the formation of our American identity. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 211H - American Literature II


    Credit(s): 3

    This survey course is designed to give students a broad overview of the evolving canon of influential works produced in American Literature from 1865 to the present. Students will examine a variety of authors including African American, Native American, Asian, and Hispanic writers, and will focus on increasing awareness of how historical, economic, social, and geographical concerns help to mold our unique American identity. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 213H - Montana Literature


    Credit(s): 3

    Students analyze Native American oral tales and examine past booms and busts: furs, exploration, cattle, mines and homestead leading to today. The journey covers 200+ years. Students evaluate historical time frames and differing viewpoints and examine Montana’s ties to the larger world and the legacies of many cultures. They explore several genres: oral tales, diaries, letters, essays, stories, poems and drama/films. Discussion uses critical thinking to evaluate issues: environmentalism, colonialism, multicultural, aboriginal and women’s rights, and Hollywood’s impact on Montana. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 216H - American Short Story


    Credit(s): 3

    This course will trace the popular literary genre known as the short story from its inception in the early 19th century through the present. The course will examine the role of the short story in American history, and will focus on stories that reflect the various social, economic, and gender concerns of male and female authors from diverse ethnic backgrounds. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 223H - British Literature I


    Credit(s): 3

    This introduction to British writers and works begins with the ancient heroes and monsters in Beowulf and continues through the Middle Ages with readings from “The Canterbury Tales,” as well as King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. The adventure continues during the Renaissance with “The Tragedy of Dr. Faustus,” then moves on to a variety of works during the Restoration and 18th century: from the stinging satire, “Gulliver’s Travels” to the hilarious comedy “She Stoops to Conquer.” Literature read throughout the course will include a number of poems, essays, plays and stories. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 224H - British Literature II


    Credit(s): 3

    The course includes Romantic poets Wordsworth and Keats, Victorians Bronte, Tennyson, and Elizabeth Barret Browning as well as 20th century writers D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Tom Stoppard and Seamus Heaney. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 225H - Shakespeare: Tragedy and Comedy


    Credit(s): 3

    In this course students will read, discuss and, if possible, see a presentation of selected tragedies and comedies: King Lear, Julius Caesar, The Tempest, A Midsummer Night’s Dream and others. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 226H - Shakespeare: History and Tragedy


    Credit(s): 3

    In this course students will read, discuss and, if possible, see a presentation of selected tragedies and history plays of Shakespeare: Hamlet, Othello, MacBeth, Henry IV, Part I, Richard II, and others. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 240 - Bible as Literature


    Credit(s): 3

    This course begins with the premise that the books of the Bible are literary and cultural documents written by men for men, not theological tracts written or inspired by God. Students will read and analyze these texts as an anthology of literature that includes history, poetry, letters, apocalyptic literature, mythological material, prophetic books, law, and other genres. Emphasis will be upon the First Testament or Hebrew Bible (the Tanakh) and Revelation. In addition, problems of textual authorship, translation, redaction, and interpolation will be introduced. Material covered will also include modern archaeology’s impact upon both biblical criticism and the historical accuracy of the biblical stories. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 271H - Introduction to Science Fiction Literature


    Credit(s): 4

    This course will study the development of science fiction as a literary genre that investigates the technological and social dilemmas encountered by humanity. The history of science fiction, the significant authors, and the genre’s moral questions will be covered through an examination of the texts and films that have framed science fiction. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    LIT 285H - Mythologies


    Credit(s): 3

    This is a lecture and discussion class that explores the Greek and Roman mythologies, their plausibility, supposed purpose, and applications, historical and contemporary. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Liberal Studies and Humanities (LSH)

  
  •  

    LSH 261H - Introduction to the Humanities Origins and Influences I


    Credit(s): 4

    This course offers an interdisciplinary survey of human creative achievements from Prehistory through the Late Middle Ages. By examining major works of art, architecture, music, literature and philosophy, students will gain an awareness of human productivity and the historical contexts that provided its inspiration, as well as an enhanced appreciation of the rich cultural heritage that informs our own contemporary identity. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    LSH 262H - Introduction to the Humanities Origins and Influences II


    Credit(s): 4

    This course offers an interdisciplinary survey of human creative achievements from Early Renaissance to Postmodernism. By examining major works of art, architecture, music, literature and philosophy, students will gain an awareness of human productivity and the historical contexts that provided its inspiration, as well as an enhanced appreciation of the rich cultural heritage that informs our own contemporary identity. (Spring Semester)

Mathematics (M)

  
  •  

    M 065~ - Prealgebra


    Credit(s): 3

    This course is designed for those students who need to improve their prealgebra skills. Topics include signed numbers, basic factoring, basic equation solving, an introduction to polynomials, square roots, basic graphing and basic exponent rules. This course may be repeated for a total of nine credits.  Students recieving financial aid or veterans’ benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 090~ - Introductory Algebra


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “SA” or “C” or better in M 065~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course provides an introduction to algebra. The course covers the topics of solving and graphing linear equations, solving systems of linear equations, introductory polynomials and factoring, basic function notation, and graphing and solving basic quadratics. Graphical and algebraic approaches to solving equations and application problems will be used throughout the course. (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 094~ - Quantitative Reasoning


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “SA” or “C” or better in M 065~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course is designed for students as the alternative to the traditional algebraic math sequence and to prepare them for college-level math courses emphasizing quantitative methods.  Emphasis will be placed on using data and appropriate mathematical models to make decisions, while developing logical reasoning and critical thinking skills.  Topics include proportional reasoning, utilizing various graphical representations, linear equations (including systems of linear equations), and basic probability and statistics.  (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 095~ - Intermediate Algebra


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 090~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course is the second semester of algebra review and provides preparation for pre-calculus.  This course concentrates on quadratic, exponential, rational and logarithmic expressions and equations. This course also covers the graphs of functions, inequalities, and solving linear systems of equations. (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 105M - Contemporary Mathematics


    Formerly: M 145 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts

    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 094~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course is an introduction to mathematical ideas and their impact on society.  The course is designed to give students the skills required to understand and interpret quantitative information that they encounter, and to make numerically based decisions in their lives.  Several math topics will be explored, including basic probability and statistics. (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 111 - Technical Mathematics


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “SA” or “C” or better in M 065~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course presents basic mathematical topics as they are applied in a trades program. Topics covered include use of measuring tools, measurement systems, dimensional arithmetic, percents, proportions, applied geometry, and basic trigonometry. This course is intended for specific programs. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    M 114 - Extended Technical Mathematics


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “SA” or “C” or better in M 065~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course presents mathematical topics as they are applied in a trades program. Topics covered include use of measuring tools, measurement systems and dimensional analysis, basic algebra topics, scientific notation, applied geometry, right and oblique triangle trigonometry, and exponential and logarithmic formulas. This course is intended for specific programs. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 115M - Probability and Linear Mathematics


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 094~ , or Math Department consent.
    The course will cover systems of linear equations and matrix algebra including linear programming. An introduction to probability with emphasis on models and probabilistic reasoning will be covered. Examples of applications will be demonstrated from a wide variety of fields. (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 120 - Mathematics with Health Care Applications


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “SA” or “C” or better in M 065~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course is designed to provide students with a solid mathematical foundation necessary to succeed in a health care profession. This course will review algebra, measurements used in health care fields, dimensional analysis, graphs and basic statistics, and cost/selling price and mark-up. (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 123 - Surveying Mathematics I


    Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score or Math Department consent.
    Corequisite(s): M 095~ .
    This course includes geometry, particularly perimeter, circumference, area and volume, and trigonometry. Trigonometry topics are both right angle and oblique angle triangles. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    M 124 - Surveying Mathematics II


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): a grade of “C” or better in M 095~  and M 123  or Math Department consent.
    This course includes analytical geometry and calculus. The calculus topics are derivatives and integrals of functions of one variable. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    M 132M - Number and Operations for K-8 Teachers


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 094~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course focuses on the study of numbers and operations for prospective elementary and middle school teachers. Topics include all subsets of the real number system, arithmetic operations and algorithms, numeration systems and problem solving. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    M 133M - Geometry and Geometric Measurement for K-8 Teachers


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 094~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course focuses on the study of geometry and geometric measurement for prospective elementary and middle school teachers. Topics include synthetic, transformational and coordinate geometry, Euclidean constructions, congruence and similarity, 2D and 3D measurement, and problem solving. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    M 152M - Precalculus Algebra


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 095~ , or Math Department consent.
    This course is the first semester of a precalculus series. Topics covered include equations, systems of linear equations and methods of solution (including matrices), exponents and radicals, linear and quadratic functions (and their graphs), exponential and logarithmic functions (and their graphs), sequences and series. (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 153M - Precalculus Trigonometry


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 152 , or Math Department consent.
    This course is the second semester of a precalculus series. Trigonometric functions are introduced using the circular and angular definitions. Trigonometric graphs, identities, equations and applications are investigated. Polar coordinates, polar graphs and conic sections are also covered. (All Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 162M - Applied Calculus


    Credit(s): 5

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 152 , or Math Department consent.
    This course is an applications oriented approach to differential and integral calculus. Topics covered are limits, derivatives, applications of derivatives, definite integrals, and applications of the definite integral; these topics are covered for functions of one variable, including exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Applications of the calculus will be demonstrated through a technology component for the course. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    M 171M - Calculus I


    Credit(s): 5

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 152  and M 153 , or Math Department consent.
    This is the first of three standard courses in calculus, the others are M 172  and M 273 . The course includes limits and continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives and integration. The types of functions studied include algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    M 172M - Calculus II


    Credit(s): 5

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 171 , or Math Department consent.
    This is the second of three standard courses in calculus. The course includes transcendental functions, applications and techniques of integration, infinite series, parametrized curves, and polar curves. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    M 221M - Introduction to Linear Algebra


    Credit(s): 4

    Corequisite(s): M 171  or Math Department consent.
    The study of vectors in the plane and space, systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Calculators and/or computers are used where appropriate. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    M 225M - Introduction to Discrete Mathematics


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): a grade of “C” or better in M 171  or Math Department consent.
    The study of mathematical elements of computer science including propositional logic, predicate logic, sets, functions, and relations, combinatorics, mathematical induction, recursion, and algorithms, matrices, graphs, trees, structures, morphisms, Boolean algebra, and computer logic. (Intermittently)
  
  •  

    M 234 - Higher Mathematics for K-8 Teachers


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): appropriate placement test score, a grade of “C” or better in M 132 , or Math Department consent.
    This course focuses on the study of algebra, number theory, probability and statistics for prospective elementary and middle school teachers. Topics include proportional reasoning, functions, elementary number theory, statistical modeling and inference, and elementary probability theory. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    M 242 - Methods of Proof


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): M 171  or Math Department consent.
    This course is an introduction to the axiomatic nature of modern mathematics. Emphasis is placed on the different methods of proof that can be used to prove a theorem. Mathematical topics discussed include symbolic logic, methods of proof, specialized types of theorems and proofs. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    M 273M - Multivariable Calculus


    Credit(s): 5

    Prerequisite(s): a grade of “C” or better in M 172  or Math Department consent.
    This is the third semester of a three semester sequence in calculus, intended for students majoring in engineering, mathematics, chemistry, or physics. It includes vectors, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and integration in vector fields. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    M 274M - Introduction to Differential Equations


    Credit(s): 5

    Prerequisite(s): a grade of “C” or better in M 273  or Math Department consent.
    This is a first course in ordinary differential equations. Topics may include: linear and non-linear first order differential equations and systems, existence and uniqueness for initial value problems, series solutions, Laplace Transformations, and linear equations of second and higher order. Applications include: forced oscillation, resonance, electrical circuits and modeling differential equations. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    M 290 - Undergraduate Research


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): instructor’s consent.
    Undergraduate research under the supervision of a full-time faculty member. This course may be repeated for a total of ten credits. Students receiving financial aid or veteran benefits should check with the Financial Aid Office before repeating this course. (Intermittently)

Media Arts (MART)

  
  •  

    MART 231 - Interactive Web I


    Credit(s): 4

    This course introduces web development tools to create websites using industry standard practices and techniques. Students use HTML5 and Cascading Style Sheets to plan, design, and develop responsive websites. Topics include web design best practices, website hosting, web graphics, design standards, and embedding media. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    MART 232 - Interactive Web II


    Credit(s): 4

    Prerequisite(s): MART 231 .
    This course focuses on teaching students advanced web design concepts. Students will further their experience with web design, focusing on HTML5, CSS3, and a CMS to create responsive designs. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    MART 234 - Emerging Web Technologies


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): MART 232 .
    An advanced web course where students will explore new and emerging web technologies. This project-based course will apply these new techniques and tools to website development. (Fall Semester)

Machining and Manufacturing Technology (MCH)

  
  •  

    MCH 101 - Introduction to Manufacturing Processes


    Credit(s): 1

    This course is designed to provide the student a learning experience with the basic tools, equipment, and operations of manufacturing industries. The goal is for the student to understand the relationship among a manufacturing need, a design, the materials and processes used, as well as the tools and equipment necessary to manufacture a product.

    Online Option:  Students opting to take the lecture portion of this course online should register for MCH 105 Introduction to Manufacturing Processes Lecture  and MCH 106 Introduction to Manufacturing Processes Lab .  Together, these courses are equivalent to MCH 101. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

  
  •  

    MCH 102 - Introduction to Manufacturing Materials


    Credit(s): 2

    This is an introductory course in the study of materials used in the manufacturing industry. Topics include selection and identification of steels, selection and identification of nonferrous metals, mechanical behavior of various plastics, hardening, case hardening, tempering, annealing, normalizing, stress relieving, and the use of the Rockwell and Brinell hardness testers.

    Online Option:  Students opting to take the lecture portion of this course online should register for MCH 107 Introduction to Manufacturing Materials Lecture  and MCH 108 Introduction to Manufacturing Materials Lab  . Together, these courses are equivalent to MCH 102. (Spring Semester)

  
  •  

    MCH 105 - Introduction to Manufacturing Processes Lecture


    Credit(s): .5

    Corequisite(s): MCH 106 .
    This lecture course is designed to provide the student a learning experience with the basic tools, equipment, and operations of manufacturing industries.  The goal is for the student to understand the relationship among a manufacturing need, a design, the materials and processes used, as well as the tools and equipment necessary to manufacture a product. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    MCH 106 - Introduction to Manufacturing Processes Lab


    Credit(s): .5

    Corequisite(s): MCH 105 .
    This lab course is designed to provide the student a learning experience with the basic tools, equipment, and operations of manufacturing industries.  The goal is for the student to experience the relationship among a manufacturing need, a design, the materials and processes used, as well as the tools and equipment necessary to manufacture a product. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    MCH 107 - Introduction to Manufacturing Materials Lecture


    Credit(s): 1.5

    Corequisite(s): MCH 108 .
    This is an introductory course in the study of materials used in the manufacturing industry. Topics include selection and identification of steels, selection and identification of nonferrous metals, mechanical behavior of various plastics, hardening, case hardening, tempering, annealing, normalizing, stress relieving, and the use of the Rockwell and Brinell hardness testers. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    MCH 108 - Introduction to Manufacturing Materials Lab


    Credit(s): .5

    Corequisite(s): MCH 107 .
    This is an introductory course in the study of materials used in the manufacturing industry. Topics include selection and identification of steels, selection and identification of nonferrous metals, mechanical behavior of various plastics, hardening, case hardening, tempering, annealing, normalizing, stress relieving, and the use of the Rockwell and Brinell hardness testers. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    MCH 110 - Introduction to CNC Lathe Operations Lecture


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): MCH 132 .
    Corequisite(s): MCH 111 .
    This course provides opportunities for students to develop skills in the setup and operation of CNC lathes.  Topics include: safety, lathe parts and controls, lathe tooling, lathe calculations, lathe setup and operations.  This is a performance-based course that requires the production of assigned tool projects. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    MCH 111 - Introduction to CNC Lathe Operations Lab


    Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): MCH 132 .
    Corequisite(s): MCH 110 .
    This course provides opportunities for students to develop skills in the setup and operation of CNC lathes.  Topics include: safety, lathe parts and controls, lathe tooling, lathe calculations, lathe setup and operations.  This is a performance-based course that requires the production of assigned tool projects. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    MCH 116 - Introduction to CNC Mill Operations Lecture


    Credit(s): 1

    Prerequisite(s): MCH 134 .
    Corequisite(s): MCH 117 .
    This course provides instruction in the setup and operation of CNC mills.  Student projects include specialty tooling and multi-axis machining.  Students will also gain experience in process control.  Topics include specialty tooling, multi-axis machining, process control, and laboratory exercises in part production. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    MCH 117 - Introduction to CNC Mill Operations Lab


    Credit(s): 2

    Prerequisite(s): MCH 134 .
    Corequisite(s): MCH 116 .
    This course provides instruction in the setup and operation of CNC mills.  Student projects include specialty tooling and multi-axis machining.  Students will also gain experience in process control.  Topics include specialty tooling, multi-axis machining, process control, and laboratory exercises in part production. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    MCH 120 - Blueprint Reading and Interpretation for Machining


    Credit(s): 3

    This course introduces the fundamental concepts necessary to interpret drawings and produce sketches for machine tool applications as applied to Machine Tool Technology. Topics include advanced sectioning, geometric dimensioning, geometric tolerance, and assembly drawings/sketching. Interpretation of specifications and determination of acceptable tolerance requirements to ensure quality control measures for design parts will also be stressed. (Fall and Spring Semesters)
  
  •  

    MCH 122 - Introduction to CAM


    Credit(s): 3

    This course introduces CAM operational basics for both mill and lathe programming using current CAM software.  The course includes terminology relevant to PC-based CAD/CAM work, hardware familiarity, system operation and management, folders, file type and structure, menu structure and use, and 2 ½ axis (milling machines) and 2 axis (lathes) tool paths.  Emphasis is placed on proper geometric creation, management, relevant utilities, C-hooks, and toolbar and menu functions. (Spring Semester)
  
  •  

    MCH 123 - Machine Quality Control and Precision Measurements Lecture


    Credit(s): 1.5

    Corequisite(s): MCH 128 .
    Students will develop the knowledge to analyze and evaluate the processes and methodology required in an industrial production environment to determine if quality control standards are being met. Topics include: use of non-precision measuring tools, use of precision measuring tools, use of comparison gauges, and analysis of measurements in a CNC environment. (Fall Semester)
  
  •  

    MCH 125 - Introduction to CNC Lathe Operations


    Credit(s): 3

    Prerequisite(s): MCH 132 .
    This course provides opportunities for students to develop skills in the setup and operation of CNC lathes. Topics include safety, lathe parts and controls, lathe tooling, lathe calculations, lathe setup and operations. This is a performance-based course that requires the production of assigned tool projects.

    Online Option:  Students opting to take the lecture portion of this course online should register for MCH 110 Introduction to CNC Lathe Operations Lecture  and MCH 111 Introduction to CNC Lathe Operations Lab .  Together, these courses are equivalent to MCH 125. (Spring Semester)

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10